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Department: Psychology


About the Department

Psychology explores the diversity and commonality of being human, seeking to discover how and why we do what we do.


Psychology as a science studies mental processes and human and animal behavior. While the roots of psychology are in philosophy and the humanities, contemporary developments strongly support grounding the discipline in scientific thought. These scientific roots place objective methods of data collection, critical thinking, analysis, and theory construction at the core of the curriculum.

In this program of studies, you may be drawn to explore the mechanisms of both human experience and the behavior of all living things. You could become invested in the use of these principles in clinical or applied settings, or even find that your knowledge will lead you into education and training. 

This program is designed to prepare you for entry-level positions that use psychological and sociological skills and knowledge; for graduate study in psychology, medical, bio-medical, and sociology and social work programs; or employment in other allied fields.

An integral component of the psychology major is the required practicum program. You will apply knowledge and skills in field settings and integrate classroom learning in fields including biopsychology, animal research, clinical/psychiatric research, guidance and counseling.

February Lecture

Hurricane Survivor SpeaksPsychological Trauma and Renewal Intertwined

Mr. Rodriguez-Rozic holds a master's degree in clinical psychology. He was a school improvement consultant in New Orleans during the time of Hurricane Katrina. He was evacuated, lost his home, and relocated to Virginia. He will speak about his personal experiences of loss and resilience through the lens of his trainign in psychology. This event is in support of the Campus Common Reading of Five Days at Memorial.

Department of Psychology in the News

After the gunfire, shoppers and workers confront emotional toll

Dr. Maria Mouratidis, associate professor and chair of the psychology department, is quoted in this Baltimore Sun article on the possible effects of trauma associated with the Columbia Mall shooting.