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School of Education

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) Outcomes Summary

A Summary of the Teacher Education Programs and Teacher Candidate and Graduate Outcomes from Notre Dame of Maryland University’s School of Education

A Description of Our Institution
Nationally Recognized Programs in the School of Education
Degrees, Programs and Areas of Certification in the School of Education
Mission of the School of Education
School of Education Teacher Candidate Outcomes and Measures Used to Evaluate Outcomes
Other Helpful Information about Accreditation Outcomes

 

A Description of Our Institution

Notre Dame of Maryland University has a proud history of serving as a catalytic change agent.  Originally conceived in 1847 (and formally founded in 1873) to educate those neglected by society, poor girls and women, this innovative school evolved from a K-12 institution and became the first women’s Catholic college in the United States to award a four-year baccalaureate degree.  Later it was recognized that women over the age of 25 could benefit from a four-year degree and the school expanded to meet this need.  Subsequently a weekend college was established to serve the needs of employed students.  Demands for a graduate school lead to both the development of several master’s degree programs and to the first Accelerated College for working professionals, both women and men. Mirroring the diversity of our society and our school, English as a second language and American culture classes also bring an international dimension to the Notre Dame of Maryland University campus. Another innovation, the Renaissance Institute (a noncredit membership program for students age 50 and older) rounds out the University’s high-impact educational offerings, thus meeting the diverse needs of yet another underserved population by emphasizing professional and personal knowledge, development, and integrity.  The final jewel in this crown of pioneering change has been the successful development of the first doctoral program, a Ph.D. in Instructional Leadership for Changing Populations.  Thus, Notre Dame of Maryland University continues its evolutionary (and sometimes revolutionary) pathway and mission to educate leaders to transform the world by providing “Distinctive undergraduate and graduate programs [that] challenge women and men to strive for intellectual and professional excellence, to build inclusive communities, to engage in service to others and to promote social responsibility.”

Nowhere is this mission more evident or vibrant than in the School of Education’s undergraduate and graduate programs where one-third of the students are people of color.  This extremely rich cultural, racial and ethnic diversity reflects a strong foundational belief in meeting the needs of those who are underserved.  Neither gender, race, age or religious affiliation serves as a barrier in our effort to transform the world.  Notre Dame of Maryland University students and faculty members come from a variety of backgrounds, bringing diverse perspectives to the academic community. The University is known for its student-centered orientation and for its faculty commitment to superior teaching and scholarship. Undergraduate and graduate students are challenged by a team of university professors who represent a full range of experiences; of 20 full-time faculty members in the School of Education, over 80% are former P-12 school teachers, principals and superintendents who have served as leaders in our nation’s urban schools.  Others have been leaders in their respective fields; e.g., in brain research, school reform, special education instruction, middle school programming, curricular design, Reading research, etc).  Equally important is the depth and breadth of associate faculty (approximately 40), all of whom currently serve or have retired from positions as educators in P-12 school settings.  Thus, they are keenly familiar with the multiplicity of challenges which confront new teachers; yet they are also cognizant of the plethora of instructional and curricular tools that can be effectively utilized to positively impact student achievement and promote the retention of new educators in the workforce.  Indeed, to accommodate cohorts of students, many of the courses are taught off-site in satellite centers/schools, thus bringing the faculty closer to the real-world teaching environment.  Therefore, our teacher candidates are ensured of being well grounded in theoretical frameworks but are equally certain to acquire the requisite practical skills needed to be successful in the classroom. 

Yet another integral part of these successful teacher preparation programs, and many would posit is the backbone of this institution, is the School Sisters of Notre Dame (SSND). The SSND congregation continues to inform and inspire the education provided at the University, with more than twenty sisters serving on the faculty, staff, or administration and seven serving as trustees.  No less than six serve within the School of Education. The Catholic tradition of the University provides the context by which intellectual dialogue is actively promoted. The SSND mission is the guiding principle of campus life: education should “empower persons to reach the fullness of their potential and enable them to direct their gifts toward building the earth.” The University’s values-centered education and high academic standards emphasize the student’s total development: intellectual, professional, social and spiritual.

Nationally Recognized Programs in the School of Education

The following programs are nationally recognized and meet standards of the profession:

 Status of National Recognition Reports by Program, 2013   

Program Name

Program Level

Agency or Association Reviewing Program

Status of Review

Art

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/Master's

 MSDE

 Maryland Approved till    2/01/2021

Administration and Supervision

Master's/Post-Master's

 ELCC

 Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

Business

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/Master's

 MSDE

 Maryland Approved till    2/01/2021

Computer Science

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/Master's

 MSDE

 Maryland Approved till    2/01/2021

Early Childhood

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/MAT

 NAEYC

 Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

Elementary Education

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/MAT

 ACEI 

 Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

Foreign Languages

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/MAT

 ACTFL

 Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

Gifted and Talented Spec.

Master's/Post-Master's

 MSDE

 Maryland Approved till    2/01/2021

Mathematics Instructional Leader

Master's/Post-Master's

 MSDE

 Maryland Approved till    2/01/2021

Library Media Specialist

Master's/Post-Master's

 ALA

  Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

Music

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/MAT

 MSDE

 Maryland Approved till    2/01/2021

Reading Specialist

Master's/Post-Master's

 IRA

 Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

Secondary English

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/MAT

 NCTE

 Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

Secondary Mathematics

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/MAT

 NCTM

 Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

Secondary Science

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/MAT

 NSTA

  Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

Secondary Social Studies

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/MAT

 NCSS

 Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

Special Education

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate/MAT

 CEC

 Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

TESOL

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate

 TESOL

 Nationally Recognized till 02/01/2021

Theatre

Undergraduate/Post-Baccalaureate

 MSDE

 Maryland Approved till    2/01/2021

 

Degrees, Programs and Areas of Certification in the School of Education

The following Table identifies the plethora of degrees, programs and areas of certification offered at Notre Dame of Maryland University:

Degrees Subject/Content/Areas of Specialization (Grade Certification) Notes

Bachelor’s Degree (BA)***

  • Art or Music, (PreK-12)
  • Early Childhood Education with Liberal Arts Degree (P-3)
  • Early Childhood and Special Education  (P-3)
  • Early Childhood and Elementary Education (PreK-6)
  • Elementary Education (1-6)
  • Elementary and Special Education (1-6)
  • Business, Computer Science, English, World Languages [French, Spanish], Math, Science [Biology, Chemistry, Physics],  History, Social Studies, or Theatre, (7-12)**

***Includes a liberal arts major or a major in a discipline, in addition to the Education certificate

**Praxis II can be taken for certification in grades 4-9
Bachelor’s/  Master of Arts Degrees (BA/MAT)***
  • Art or Music, (PreK-12)
  • Early Childhood, Special Education and TESOL  (P-3)
  • Elementary Education (1-6)
  • Elementary and Special Education (1-6)
  • Business, Computer Science, English, World or Classical Foreign Languages, Math, Science [Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physical Science, Physics], History, Social Studies, or Theatre, (each one with or without Special Education), (7-12)**

***Includes a liberal arts major or a major in a discipline, in addition to the Education certificate

**Praxis II can be taken for certification in grades 4-9
Master of Arts in Teaching Degree (MAT)

10-Month/Fast Track , 15-Month/Full-time or 2-Year/Part -Time Programs:

  • Art or Music, (PreK-12)
  • Early Childhood Education (PreK-3)
  • Early Childhood and Elementary Education (PreK-6)
  • Early Childhood and Special Education (PreK-3)
  • Elementary Education (1-6)
  • Elementary and Special Education (1-6)
  • Business, Computer Science, English, World or Classical Foreign Languages [Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish], Math, Science [Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physical Science, Physics], History, Social Studies, or Theatre , (each one with or without Special Education), (7-12)**
  • TESOL
**Praxis II can be taken for certification in grades 4-9

Master’s Degree (MA) 

  • Administration & Supervision for Changing Populations
  • Catholic School Leader/Teacher
  • Gifted and Talented
  • Leadership in Special Education
  • Leadership in Teaching:  Administration and Supervision
  • Leadership in Teaching:  Library Media Specialist
  • Leadership in Teaching:  Mathematics
  • Leadership in Teaching:  Reading Specialist
  • Leadership in Teaching:  Spanish
  • Leadership in Teaching:  Special Education
  • Leadership in Teaching:  STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
  • Leadership in Teaching:  TESOL
 

Certificate of Advanced Studies (CASE)

  • Administration and Supervision
  • Gifted and Talented
  • Library Media Specialist
  • Special Education
  • Spanish
  • STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
  • TESOL
 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
  • Leadership for Changing Populations
 
Certificates Subject/Content/Areas of Specialization (Grade Certification) Notes

Renewal of Certification (non degree, graduate level courses)

  • Six (6) semester hours of acceptable credit* which are offered in a variety of on-line, face-to-face and hybrid delivery modes
*Acceptable Credits are:   (1) Earned or taught at NDMU; (2) Related to a school assignment; and (3) Earned within 5 years immediately preceding the date on which your certificate was issued
Initial Certification via Advanced Teaching Certification (ACT), (non degree, graduate level courses)
  • Art or Music, (PreK-12)
  • Early Childhood Education (PreK-3) with Liberal Arts Major
  • Early Childhood and Elementary Education (PreK-6)
  • Special Education Childhood and Early Childhood (PreK-3)
  • Elementary Education (1-6)
  • Elementary and Special Education (1-6)
  • Business, Computer Science, English, World or Classical Foreign Languages [Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish], Math, Science [Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physical Science, Physics], History, Social Studies, or Theatre , (each one with or without Special Education), (7-12)**
**Praxis II can be taken for certification in grades 4-9
Post Masters (non degree, graduate level courses)
  • Administration and Supervision
  • Gifted and Talented
  • Library Media Specialist
  • Math Instructional Leader
  • Reading Specialist
  • STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) (PreK-8)
  • TESOL, (PreK-12)
 

 

Mission of the School of Education

The mission of the School of Education is to provide rigorous Teacher Education Programs which seek, above all, to instill in our students a desire to be proactive as future leaders and decision-makers within the education enterprise, and to value teaching as the vocation that enables the choices of others and supports the human impulse to grow.  These programs are designed to present the vocation of teaching as the vital link between our private and public worlds, and our personal fulfillment, professional development, and social responsibility.  Our aim is to nurture and help focus the program participants’ consciousness of vocational commitment and purpose as they develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of competent professionals.  The approach taken throughout the program is characteristically holistic, shaping and defining our roles as educators within the larger contexts and diverse environments and dimensions of education: public and private; elementary and secondary; urban, suburban, and rural; local, national, and global.  The program is holistic also in the sense that the artificial boundaries between content and processes, curriculum and instruction, and knowledge and values are erased by faculty who teach through modeling an array of instructional approaches, and, as reflective practitioners, raise the important moral and ethical issues embedded in teaching decisions.  As individuals who care, listen to, understand and respect one another, faculty and students together create a community of shared inquiry as well as a community of purpose through the following commonly-shared values that we believe are inherent qualities of sound teaching and meaningful learning (and which are referred to as our RSVP Conceptual Framework): 

Research

 

Research-based and experience-based teaching within a liberal arts tradition enables the educator to act with the integrity that comes from knowing what one is doing and why one is doing it.

Self-Reflection

 

 

Reflection in action and critical self-knowledge enable the educator to articulate a point of view that is guided by informed reason rather than rhetoric, a personally appropriated value position, and attentive self-assessment.

Vocation

 

Teaching is a vocation or “calling” in which the meaning of professionalism gives equal weight to both competence and virtue.

Practice

 

Teachers who exhibit visionary leadership and commitment to life long learning, apply exemplary educational practices, which encourage and enable others to act with imagination, risk-taking, intention, and invention.

Five specific outcomes, which are derived from this RSVP framework and are embedded in each of the School of Education teacher preparation programs, are designed to prepare teachers with the requisite skills needed to promote student achievement accordingly:  Research-based and experience-based teaching within a liberal arts tradition enables the educator to act with the integrity that comes from knowing what one is doing and why one is doing it. (1) Demonstrate a general knowledge base in the liberal arts and in specific content appropriate for teaching.  (2) Demonstrate effective application of principles derived from the ongoing relationship between research-informed theory and practice.  Reflection in action and critical self-knowledge enable the educator to articulate a point of view that is guided by informed reason rather than rhetoric, a personally appropriated value position, and attentive self-assessment. (3) Exemplify the qualities of a reflective practitioner through analysis and assessment of teaching practices and behaviors, redesigning instruction to meet individual needs.  Teaching is a vocation or “calling” in which the meaning of professionalism gives equal weight to both competence and virtue.  (4) Act and make decisions guided by a philosophy of teaching and leanings rooted in a moral system that values the development and diversity of each individual.  Teachers who exhibit visionary leadership and commitment to life-long learning apply exemplary educational practices, which encourage and enable others to act with imagination, risk-taking, intention, and invention.  (5) Create a safe and interactive environment in which students are both empowered and free to take risks, to think analytically, critically, and creatively, to make informed choices and to act responsibly.

School of Education Teacher Candidate Outcomes and Measures Used to Evaluate Outcomes

The aforementioned RSVP outcomes (designed in a cross-curricular format and approved jointly by the School of Education and the School of Arts and Sciences) are rigorously assessed throughout the Teacher candidate’s academic and clinical experience.  Using a Chalk and Wire platform for e-Portfolios and rubrics tailored for each task, faculty members assess the quality of student works (artifacts) which are closely aligned to individual course assignments and which mirror InTASC standards.  These artifacts are routinely reviewed, analyzed and refined by faculty in order to strengthen their utility for the prospective teacher and to ensure national recognition by NCATE.  Moreover, two major components that cross all programs, undergraduate, post-baccalaureate, and master’s programs (with and without certification components) are “reflection” on the Conceptual Framework (RSVP) and “candidate dispositions.”  For example, the candidate disposition for initial certification is obtained at three different levels of the candidate’s program.  The candidates complete a self-reflection early in their program; the second assessment is completed by the method’s instructor prior to the internship, and the final disposition is completed by the candidate, the mentor teacher, and the supervisor.  Each is designed to be recursive and to hold all parties accountable to the rigorous standards of the School of Education.

Notre Dame of Maryland University, though comparatively small to our many neighboring colleges and universities in Maryland, yields the third largest number of teacher certificates.  While some of these certificates are attained by undergraduates in our liberal arts/elementary education program, the vast majority are attained through our Master’s degree programs. These degrees in teacher education are largely designed to cultivate and provide teachers to mirror the increasing diversity of the student population in Maryland and to fill some our largest gaps in the workforce: special education, TESOL, mathematics and science. 

The following metrics are presented to document the strength of our programs and the success of our graduates. These metrics include Praxis I and II scores, mentor teachers perceptions of student teachers, program requirements, graduate survey data, employment status, etc.

A.Praxis Scores:  As a requirement for admission to the School of Education, all candidates must pass Praxis I.  This ensures that 100% of all candidates eligible for internship have passed Praxis I.  As a requirement for teacher (or advanced degree) certification, all candidates must also pass Praxis II to demonstrate their command of the content knowledge in their respective field of study.  The following results were obtained for 2010-2011 and posted in the annual Title II Report for Higher Education:

Single-Assessment Institution Level Pass-Rate Data for Praxis II: Regular Teacher Preparation Program

Educational Testing Service

HEA – Title II 2012-2013 Academic Year

State

Maryland

Type of Assessment

Number Taking Assessment

Number Passing Assessment

Institutional Pass Rate

Statewide Pass Rate

Professional Knowledge

 

 

 

 

Elementary Education Content Area Exercises

2

3

100%

NA

Elementary Education Instructional Practice

48

48

100%

100%

English Language Literature Comp Pedagogy

1

1

100%

NA

English Language Literature Comp Content & Analysis

15

15

100%

98%

Social Studies: Pedagogy

4

4

100%

NA

Life Science: Pedagogy

1

1

100%

NA

Principles Learning & Teaching Early Child

15

15

100%

100%

Principles Learning & Teaching K-6

50

50

100%

100%

Principles Learning & Teaching 7-12

57

57

100%

100%

Elementary Education Content Knowledge

5

5

100%

100%

Early Childhood Content Knowledge

15

15

100%

100%

English Language Literature Comp Content Knowledge

6

6

100%

100%

Mathematics Content Knowledge

6

6

100%

99%

Social Studies: Content & Interpretation

9

9

100%

96%

Social Studies: Content Knowledge

5

5

100%

100%

Business Education

7

7

100%

NA

Art Content and Analysis

7

7

100%

100%

Art Content Trad Critic Aesthetics

11

11

100%

NA

French: World Language

1

1

100%

 

WPT Chinese

1

1

100%

 

OPI Mandarin

1

1

100%

 

Biology Content Knowledge

7

7

100%

98%

Chemistry Content Instruction

3

3

100%

100%

Chemistry Physics and General Science

2

2

100%

NA

Physics Content Knowledge

1

1

100%

NA

Music Content Knowledge

1

1

100%

98%

Theatre

2

2

100%

NA

Special Education Core Knowledge & Applications

48

48

100%

100%

English to Speakers of Other Languages II

10

10

100%

100%

1 The number of program completers found, matched and used in the passing rate calculation will not equal the sum of the column labeled "Number Taking Assessment" since a completer can take more than one assessment

 

B. Teacher Candidate Preparation Outcomes:

Each semester mentor teachers, from the many Professional Development School sites with which the University partners, assess the performance of teacher candidates on a wide range of specific skills that are aligned to the ten InTASC standards that were developed by the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO)’s Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium.  For a complete listing of these ten standards and their respective indicators associated with performances, essential knowledge and critical dispositions, go to:    http://www.ccsso.org/Documents/2011/InTASC_Model_Core_Teaching_Standards_2011.pdf  The SOE faculty and staff use this critical feedback to guide future decisions pertaining to program preparation.  These mentor teachers repeatedly assign very high marks to the SOE and its preparation of these teacher candidates (as depicted in the table that follows).

Mentor’s Assessment of Intern’s Preparation– Results Spring 2013 – Mean Scores (Scale of 1-4)

Criterion/Mean Scores (InTASC Standards)

The Intern: 
Mean Score

Competence

(Rated 3 or 4)
1.Demonstrates knowledge of subject matter  (I - 4)                                   3.6  98%
2. Demonstrates knowledge of human dev via developmentally appropriate practices (I – 1,8)  3.5  98%
3.Provides for individual learning needs  (I - 2)  3.5  98%
4.Demonstrates cross-cultural understanding by reducing biases via materials/strategies  (I – 2,5)  3.5  95%
5.Uses effective strategies  (I - 8)  3.4  93%
6.Uses multiple teacher roles (facilitator, director, participant)  (I - 8)  3.4  86%
7.Incorporates Higher Order Thinking Skills into lessons & assessments  (I – 5,8)  3.5  91%
8. Attempts to group students to satisfy instructional goals & foster social interaction.  (I – 3,7)  3.6  93%
9.Engages students in productive & active learning   (I – 1,3,5)   3.6  93%
10.Communicates standard of conduct & responds appropriately to student behavior  (I – 3,9)  3.4  86%
11.Promotes class discussion and collaboration  (I – 3,5)  3.5  95%
12.Models Spoken language- rarely makes errors  (I – 5,8)  3.5  98%
13.Models Spoken language- monitors students' usage  (I – 5,8)  3.6  98%
14.Models Writing Skills- rarely makes errors  (I – 5,8)  3.7  95%
15. Models Writing Skills – monitors students’ usage  (I – 5,8)  3.5  95%
16.1Uses technology to support learning goals  (I – 2,5,8)  3.6  93%
17.Prepares written lesson plans that are effective  (I - 7)  3.6  93%
18. Uses materials that are appropriate, varied, and support objectives  (I – 6,7)  3.6  95%
19.Uses Informal & formal strategies that are appropriate and varied  (I – 7,8)  3.6  95%
20.Demonstrates assessment of learning that is accurate and assesses student progress (I - 6)  3.5  95%
21.Is routinely reflective in his/her practice- accurately judges effectiveness of instruction  (I - 9)  3.6  93%
22.Takes advantage of school opportunities/resources for professional development   (I - 9)  3.5  98%
23.Develops a good working relationship with school personnel  (I - 10)  3.8  95%
24.Develops a good working relationship with parents/community  (I - 10)  3.6  93%
25.Demonstrates regular attendance  (I - 9)  3.7  100%
26.Presents/communicates absence and leaves complete plans  (I – 7,9)  3.5  91%
27.Demonstrates Punctuality  (I - 9)  3.8  100%
28.Maintains a Professional Appearance  (I - 9)  3.8  100%
29.Has a voice that is effective(appropriate volume/inflection)  (I - 9)  3.6  93%
30.Displays a Professional Attitude  (I – 9,10)  3.8  95%
31.Demonstrates Self-Confidence  (I - 9)  3.6  93%
32.Demonstrates Initiative  (I - 10)  3.7  93%
33.Uses feedback (accepting/responsive)  (I – 9,10)  3.8  93%
Total Number of Mentors who responded   44  

Specific comments offered by mentor teachers in this survey included the following:

  • “She has been a wonderful intern who has embraced every opportunity in her path. She is highly reflective and ready to try a new approach during a lesson. She has taken on more than a "normal" intern would just so she "could get the full experience". I am very confident that she will make a great teacher in the near future and any school would be lucky to have her on staff!”
  • "was a wonderful intern to work with. She's very professional, organized and has been a great asset to our classroom."
  • “Both the students and I have learned a great deal of things from her, both about academic subjects and about inter-personal relationship skills. We will miss her presence and her contributions to our daily life immensely.”
  • “If my intern is typical of the educators you are producing, then Notre Dame is doing an outstanding job!”
  • “She came to me for her first student teaching placement and was incredibly prepared. She was ready to take over teaching within 2 weeks (WOW!) and did an incredible job.”
  • “Interns seemed very knowledgeable about educational policies and practices, so I'm glad this is a part of the instructional program at Notre Dame.”
  • “I feel my intern is well prepared for this career, and has a solid foundation of Common Core Standards and a variety of instructional strategies to engage and effectively teach students.”
  • “I felt that my intern was very prepared to take on the role of a special education teacher!”
  • “She has been more than a student teacher at our school. She has become a member of our community here. The students show respect for her as a teacher because she models consistency, individual consideration and respect for all others.”

C. Clinical Practice Requirements and Outcomes and Consistency/Accuracy in Measurement:

  1. A minimum of 15 field/clinical days are required of candidates in the School of Education.  Most programs include a full three-week clinical experience to meet or exceed this requirement.
  2. The student teaching (internship) is a minimum of 100 days and depending upon the program of study is rendered over a nine, ten or twenty-week experience.  This NDMU minimal requirement is in alignment with the required Professional Development School standards that require all initial full time interns to complete a minimum of 100 days of clinical and student-teaching to successfully complete their internship requirements.  Most NDMU candidates exceed these minimal expectations which vary significantly due to a hybrid of different pathways to initial certification.
  3. Within the student teaching experience, candidates teach full-time a minimum of four weeks.  However, this varies depending upon the proficiency of the intern; most teacher candidates exceed this minimum expectation and assume full teaching or co-teaching responsibilities related to planning and executing lessons.
  4. 100% of the teacher candidates in the 2012-2013 academic year satisfactorily completed the clinical practice requirements, including methods courses, student teaching, and action research projects.
  5. With regard to the Professional Knowledge Praxis II requirement
    1. 100% of the 334 program completers in 2010-2011 passed the Professional Knowledge Praxis II requirements
    2. 100% of the 292 program completers in 2011-2012 passed the Professional Knowledge Praxis II requirements
    3. 100% of the 322 program completers in 2012-2013 passed the Professional Knowledge Praxis II requirements

D. Graduate Outcomes:

1. Survey Data obtained from initial certification program completers are obtained each semester.  These data consistently demonstrate that teacher candidate graduates are confident that their NDMU preparation program has been rigorous and has fully prepared them to pursue a career in the teaching profession.  Each of these criteria is aligned to the InTASC standards.  The following data were obtained from the Fall 2013 survey:

Graduate Survey Regarding Teacher Preparation Program – Fall 2013
Criterion/Mean Scores  (InTASC Standards)

Mean Score

(1-4)

% Satisfied

(3 or 4 Rating)
Concept of Discipline/Content  (I – 4) 3.6 100%
Disciplinary Processes   (I – 3,5) 3.4 100%
Subject Area Integration  (I – 5,10) 3.5 100%
Student Learning Process  (I – 1,2) 3.5 100%
Attention to the Whole Child  (I – 1,2,3) 3.8 100%
Diverse Learning Styles  (I – 2) 3.8 100%
Instructional Differentiation  (I – 2,6,7,8) 3.5 100%
Active Learning  (I – 3,5) 3.5 100%
Variety of Instructional Strategies  (I – 8) 3.7 100%
Thinking Skills Development   (I – 1,2,5,8) 3.4 100%
Positive Learning Environment  (I – 3) 3.9 100%
Motivational Strategies  (I – 3,8) 3.6 100%
Classroom Management Strategies   (I – 3) 3.3 84%
Verbal and Nonverbal Communication  (I – 2,3,8) 3.5 100%
Technology Integration  (I – 2,5,8) 3.3 74%
Standards-based Unit Planning  (I – 4,7) 3.6 100%
Standards-based Lesson Planning  (I –4,7 ) 3.6 100%
Formative Assessment  (I – 6) 3.6 100%
Summative Assessments  (I –6 ) 3.6 100%
Multiple Approaches to Assessment  (I – 6) 3.6 95%
Ongoing Self-reflection  (I – 9) 3.8 100%
Professional Growth Opportunities  (I – 9,10) 3.5 95%
Teacher-Parent Connections  (I – 10) 3.3 84%
School Community Collaborations  (I – 10) 3.3 95%
Shared Values and Mutual Respect w Students (I – 2,3,10) 3.7 100%

2. Employment Status of Completers for Initial Certification

Based on direct reporting from 2012-2013 graduates of the School of Education who were deemed eligible for their initial teaching certification, the following chart depicts the employment status of these candidates.

Year of program completion

Total number of completers*

Employed in a position for which they were prepared

Employed in an education position outside of their preparation

Enrolled in higher education

Employed outside of the education field

Not employed

Unknown

2012-2013

196

158 (80%)

17 (9%)

1**

2 (1%)

1**

17 (9%)

 

These 158 program completers from 2012-2013 are now employed in the field of education accordingly:

Maryland Public Schools:

 

Anne Arundel County Public Schools    

25

Baltimore City Public Schools                   

16

Baltimore County Public Schools             

19

Calvert County Public Schools                   

8

Charles County Public Schools                  

3

Harford County Public Schools                  

4

Howard County Public Schools                 

7

Montgomery County Public Schools        

3

Prince Georges County Public Schools   

2

St. Mary’s County Public Schools               

6

Maryland Private, Parochial and Independent Schools

 

Archdiocese & Other Catholic Schools

43

Private and Independent                         

21

Out-of-State and Country

 

1 Each in Delaware, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Texas and Virginia

6

1 in Central America                                    

1

TOTAL

 

158

*It is important to note that, in addition to these 196 completers for initial certification, there were an additional 73 completers of advanced certification; e.g., teachers seeking a dual certification; teachers seeking a master’s degree in gifted and talented education; teachers seeking to obtain their certification as administrators, etc.  Equally important is the fact that, of these 196 initial completers, 67 of them completed a dual certification; e.g., elementary education AND special education certification.  At least another 28 completed an alternative teacher preparation program.  Plus, there were additional graduates from 2011-2012 who did not get ‘stamped’ for certification until August 2012 and therefore were automatically counted among the total 322 initial certification completers of 2012-2013.

** Less than 1%

Starting Salaries – Starting salaries for new teachers vary from school district to school district in the Maryland Public Schools and across the nation.  The following link provides access to the most recently published annual report for starting salaries for 2010-11.  The salary range was from $40,400 in Carroll County to $46,411 in Montgomery County for a bachelor’s degree, as noted on page 5 of this report.  .  The range for a starting salary with a master’s degree was from $40,855 in Carroll County to $51,128 in Montgomery County.  

http://www.marylandpublicschools.org/NR/rdonlyres/CAFE5C56-843C-4D45-8DDB-D7D26146E60F/25636/salsch12.pdf

The following sample quotes from graduates reflect their perceptions regarding how they impacted student learning and achievement during their internship experience:

A secondary education graduate observed that “I impacted my students by being available for extra support and guidance. I designed and implemented lessons that incorporated many strategies that scaffolded and differentiated instruction in order to meet their specific learning needs. I measure their learning by interactive lessons for guided practice and summative and formative assessments that give them options to express their mastery of knowledge.”

A graduate who earned dual certification in special education and elementary education observed, “I connected with each and every one of my students! I was lucky enough to have my internship take place in the school I have been a part of for three years, so I had a connection with no only my students but the staff as well. I have been able to measure the learning of my students through my various ways of teaching e.g. group lessons, one-to-one instruction and whole group classroom activities. I feel as though I bring a mature yet fun and professional way of teaching into the classroom and for that I feel that I am ready to take on whatever position I am offered!”

Another dual-certified graduate in elementary and early childhood education posited, “I believe I impacted the learning of my students in a positive way. I used a variety of teaching strategies in order for all students to learn in a different way. I also measured my student’s progress by using formative assessments such as exit tickets to view student understanding. I wanted to use differentiation so that all students were able to learn while I was teaching.”

An elementary education graduate noted, “I believe I learned as much from my students as they learned from me. Teaching seems to be a growth process, learning to recognize the abilities and motivation necessary to make them successful. Their learning is measured by how engaged they are in the lesson, and I could always tell how well they were learning by how much they participated in the lesson.”

Another elementary education teacher graduate stated, “I believe that the biggest influence that I had on my students was to promote a positive attitude towards learning. I approach teaching and learning with a "can do" attitude and I believe that children will adopt a similar attitude if they are exposed to this attitude. I believe their growth was reflected in the progress they made on a daily basis within the classroom. For instance, I worked with a small group of students in third grade with place value concepts. As the weeks went by, I saw that their number sense became much better and as a result, their confidence increased.”

Other Helpful Information about Accreditation Outcomes

A. Date of Last Review:February 24-26, 2013

B. The following six areas of strength were documented by the Board of Examiners during the February 2013 on-site visitations:

  • "SoE training (course offerings, workshops, etc.) for PreK-12 faculty is timely, PreK-12 school needs-focused, and effective"
  • "Multiple stakeholders note that interns come to the clinical experience with competencies valuable to the PreK-12 facility in the delivery of instruction, professional development in technology, and support for school improvement plan efforts. Principals, specifically, note interns and new teachers come to their schools with skills beyond those held by current practitioners. SoE alumni are exceptionally well prepared for their positions in the PreK-12 community."
  • "Integration of the MTTS standards throughout program course work and assessments ensures candidate proficiency in the use of instructional and productivity technology."
  • "The unit is commended on the quality of its faculty as well as the faculty's scholarly agenda."
  • "The SoE Handbook provides extensive information for the unit faculty and external stakeholders concerning the programs, expectations, and policies used to conduct school activities. Interviews with multiple groups attest to the amount of valuable information provided by this reference manual."
  • "The unit and university have established a strong sense of community that is evident to anyone visiting NDMU for more then a few hours. This environment is an intentional extension of its mission, conceptual framework, and school values. The unit lives its mission."

C. Two areas for improvement were noted by the Board of Examiners:

  • "There is no systematic mechanism to ensure that all stakeholders have the opportunity to provide feedback on unit operations. (ITP, ADV). Employers, school-based personnel, and candidates do not provide summative feedback on a regular, systematic, and consistent basis."
  • "The unit does not maintain the minimum number of interns at each PDS required by state standards. (ITP) There are fewer than five (5) interns placed in some PDS schools."

D. Notre Dame of Maryland University's School of Education is addressing these two areas for improvement as follows:

  • The School of Education (SoE) systematically uses a variety of surveys to elicit feedback from its many stakeholders. Each of these respective surveys has since been modified to include a question(s) pertinent to the unit's operations. For example, in the survey of mentor teachers regarding the performance of candidates (student interns), the SoE asks these open-ended questions: "Please identify any kudos or concerns that you might have regarding the operational effectiveness of the School of Education with respect to the assigning and/or preparation of interns" and "Please provide and additional comments that you believe are beneficial to the enhancement of the teacher preparation program provided by Notre Dame of Maryland University".
  • A new survey instrument to PDS-based personnel is designed to generate added information from these stakeholders as to how the SoE can improve its services.
  • In addition to these revised and new survey instruments, forums with stakeholders have been held to gather additional feedback regarding the SoE's operational effectiveness.
  • Finally, while the SoE supports the overall professional development model used in our state, we strongly believe that the requirement for a minimum number of five (5) interns at each Professional Development School (PDS) site is an unwarranted and overly-restrictive burden on the university, the schools, the mentor teachers and the interns. Notwithstanding these strong convictions based on a supporting rationale, the SoE has taken the necessary steps to sever its long-standing relationship with three PDS sites to better ensure that we attain the minimum number of interns at each of the remaining sites.

E. Schools/Districts in Partnership with NDMU's School of Education:  The SoE maintains active partnerships with Anne Arundel County, Baltimore City, Baltimore County, Harford County, and the Archdiocese of Baltimore.  These five partnerships support the following Professional Development Schools (PDS) and sites where students engage in field and internship experiences.  They include:

Anne Arundel County Public Schools

  • Arnold Elementary
  • Belvedere Elementary
  • Lothian Elementary
  • Severn River Middle
  • Broadneck High

Baltimore City Public Schools

  • John Ruhrah Elementary/Middle
  • Medfield Heights Elementary
  • Western High School

Baltimore County Public Schools

  • Oakleigh Elementary
  • Hillcrest Elementary
  • Johnnycake Elementary
  • Stemmers Run Middle
  • Kenwood High
  • Woodlawn High

Harford County Public Schools

  • Church Creek Elementary
  • Forest Hill Elementary Hill H
  • Aberdeen High/Middle
  • G. Lisby-Hillsdale Elementary

Archdiocese of Baltimore

  • Mother Seton Academy
  • St. Thomas Aquinas

F. Date of Next On-Site Visit: 2020