Popular Resources

BIO-107-20, Human Biology (SU14)

INSTRUCTOR: Qiaoling Yao, M.D. & Ph.D.

SCHEDULE/DAY/TIME: T1/Tuesday & Thursday/6:00 pm-9:00 pm, 5/27/2014-6/26/2014

CONTENT:

Focuses on how the major body systems are organized and function. Examines various major health concerns, such as cardiovascular health, cancer, diabetes and obesity, and explains their relationship to proper body function. Emphasizes how well-informed decisions about lifestyle can keep body systems operating at their best. Laboratory exercises include application of key principles of structure and function for major body systems. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory integrated. Fulfillsgeneral education requirement in natural science. Designed for non-science majors.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

-Describe the basic structure of the human body systems

-Explain the relationship between the structure and function of the major body systems

-Describe and analyze basic physiological processes carried out by major body systems

-Apply an understanding of basic physiological processes to everyday situations and major health-basedecisions

-Describe the effects of major transitions undergone by human in evolution over time

METHODS:

Lecture, small group activities, discussion, laboratory exercises

REQUIREMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS: 

Class preparation, participation, and follow-up - 25%        

Regular quizzes - 10%

Major assignments - 20%       

Course tests - 20%

Final exam (Cumulative, subjective; application; open notes) - 25%

REQUIRED TEXT(S) OR MATERIALS: 

-Human Biology, concepts and current issues, by Michael D. Johnson, the fifth edition.

-Course-dedicated flashdrive

-It is also helpful to have a separate folder/binder and notebook for this course and colored markers.

RECOMMENDED READINGS OR MATERIALS: 

Anatomy & Physiology for Dummies, the  2nd edition

READINGS AND/OR ASSIGNMENTS TO BE DONE PRIOR TO THE FIRST CLASS:

Write a one-page letter of introduction and e-mail it to Dr. Yao at (qyao@ndm.edu). You might include some or all of the following: 1) your hometown, 2) your major, 3) in relation to this class, what are your strengths, weaknesses, fears, and goals, 4) what your roles are (jobs, church callings, parent, etc.) and how they might affect your performance in this class, 5) what your background in science is, 6) how human biology might play a role in your future, 7) tell me what I can do to help you achieve your goals in this class.