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ENG-410-01, Top: Fairy Tales/Fable/Folklore (SU13)

INSTRUCTOR: Ray Bossert

SCHEDULE/DAY/TIME: T1/Saturday/8:30-11:15 AM, 06/01/2013-06/2-2013

CONTENT:

This course will trace the development of fairy tales, fables, and folklore from their earliest recorded incarnations to their development into children’s art and subsequent re-generation as mature narratives in contemporary media. We will read tales from across world literatures and cultures. Readings may include selections from Aesop, Hans Christian Anderson, the Brothers Grimm, Wu Cheng’en’s Monkey, modern authors such as J.M.Barrie and J.R.R.Tolkien, contemporary adaptations such as Willingham’s Fables comic book series, as well as critical and theoretical essays on the stories and genres.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

-to learn about literary forms and genres across world cultures

-to recognize the difference in narrative structures as well from other aspects of literature such as imagery and diction

-to interpret literature beyond surface explication in order to read literature symbolically and/or allegorically

-to gain greater appreciation for narrative in its historical, social, and geographical context

-to consider stories as an artistic means of individuals seeking to interface with the surrounding world

-to practice written and spoken analysis and interpretation of these texts

-to compare themes and approaches of world literatures

-to consider past literature in light current events

METHODS:  

-Class sessions will be a hybrid of lecture and class discussion. Students will be expected to have read material and discuss their own interpretations of the texts.

-This will be a “web-enhanced” course. There will be a few handouts that I will distribute electronically.

REQUIREMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS: 

-Each class will have a quiz component, mainly consisting of objective questions of plot and characters (quizzes will total 20%). Some quizzes might ask for interpretive reflection. There will be three short papers for this class: a synthesis paper (20%), an application paper (20%), and a creative assignment (20%). Class participation and attendance will be weighed at 20%.

-Attendance is required for all class sessions. Do not register for this course if you cannot attend all sessions. In the event of a documented medical emergency, one absence may be excused upon providing documented evidence. However, because this course only meets five times, missing two classes even in the event of a documented emergency will result in an immediate failure. Do not plan trips, vacations, or other events during our class sessions. They will not count as excused absences.

REQUIRED TEXT(S) OR MATERIALS: 

-Aesop’s Fables. trans. V.S. Vernon Jones. Wordsworth Classics, 1994.ISBN: 1853261289

-Andersen, Hans Christian. Andersen’s Fairy Tales. Wordsworth Classics, 1983.ISBN: 1853261009

-Barrie, J.M. Peter Pan: Peter and Wendy and Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens ISBN: 978-0142437933

-Ch’eng-en, Wu. Monkey: Folk Novel of China. trans. Arthur Waley. Grove Press ISBN: 978-0-8021-3086-0

-Cole, Joanna. Best-loved Folktales of the World. New York: Anchor Books. ISBN 978-0-385-18949-1

Grimms’ Tales for Young and Old: The Complete Stories. trans. Ralph Manheim 0385189508

Tolkien, J.R.R. The Tolkien Reader. ISBN: 978-0345345066

Willingham, Bill. Fables Vol. 1: Legends in Exile. ISBN: 978-1401237554

READINGS AND/OR ASSIGNMENTS TO BE DONE PRIOR TO THE FIRST CLASS:

-Aesop (15-24, 33-35, 46-47, 56-57, 62-63, 70-72, 91-92, 111-112, 123-124, 191-192, 197)

-Anansi Stories (from Best Loved, 615-623, 741-745)

-Genesis, Chapters 2-3

-Monkey (pp 1-60)