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Image: Week of July 28, 2014

Week of July 28, 2014

The Bulletin is published every other week during the summer.

In This Issue:

News and Notices

NDMU partners with Google for its first virtual campus tour
NDMU Awarded National Trust for Historic Preservation Grant for Gibbons Hall Preservation Plan
Faculty Reserves
Film Series at NDMU

Notre Dame in the News

City Paper on Dr. Gene Farrington's The Blue Heron
NDMU Students in the Huffington Post

Professional Activities

School of Education: Sister Mary Fitzgerald SSND


News and Notices

NDMU partners with Google for its first virtual campus tour

Notre Dame has been offered an exciting opportunity to partner with Google on a virtual campus tour, similar to the popular Street View tours that show 360-degree panoramic vistas available on Google Maps. Notre Dame will be the first university to take advantage of this very special pilot program with Google, so needless to say we are thrilled!

The tour will show up as part of our Google search results and will enable prospective students and visitors to virtually walk around our campus and to enter select areas of our buildings, providing an unparalleled insider's view of our beautiful campus. It is scheduled to go live before the start of the academic year. The Google photographic team was on campus last week and is finishing up today. They will edit the images and post the virtual tour to our Google Plus page, and we'll be able to embed it on our website as well. Stay tuned for the finished product.

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NDMU Awarded National Trust for Historic Preservation Grant for Gibbons Hall Preservation Plan

Notre Dame of Maryland University (NDMU) has been awarded a $5,000 grant by the National Trust for Historic Preservation to hire an architect to create a preservation plan for historic Gibbons Hall. The award from the Johanna Favrot Fund for Historic Preservation comes as the Merrick Tower of the iconic campus building, opened in 1873 by the founding School Sisters of Notre Dame, is being readied for repair work this summer.

“Organizations like Notre Dame of Maryland help to ensure that communities and towns all across America retain their unique sense of place," said Stephanie Meeks, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. "We are honored to provide a grant to NDMU, which will use the funds to help preserve an important piece of our shared national heritage."

“We are honored with the recognition by the National Trust for Historic Preservation of the cultural, historical and architectural importance of Gibbons Hall,” said NDMU President Dr. Marylou Yam. “The preservation plan will help Notre Dame steward Gibbons’ proud heritage as housing the first Catholic women’s college to award the four-year baccalaureate degree.”

The goal of the preservation plan is to assist NDMU decision makers and facility managers in preserving and restoring the exterior of the 140-year-old building. In its grant application, NDMU proposed to hire a preservation consultant to survey the exterior of Gibbons Hall and provide an inventory of the condition of its 278 windows and associated wood trim, the mansard slate roof, masonry walls, paint, and the associated composition of Merrick Tower, the building’s signature bell tower. The plan to be completed by July 2015 will recommend specific work to preserve, restore and recondition Gibbons; estimate costs of restoration work; and develop a phasing plan to complete work.

In addition to serving as a guide for the stewardship of Gibbons, Dr. Yam also expressed hope that the plan would help attract private and public funds to implement its recommendations. The National Trust grant requires matching funds to pay for the preservation plan, which have been provided through a $10,000 gift designated for Gibbons restoration work by a friend of the University, said Patricia A. Bosse ’81, the University’s vice president for institutional advancement.

In April 1896, the building now known as Gibbons Hall housed the administration offices, classrooms and dormitory of the Notre Dame Collegiate Institute for Young Ladies, when the State of Maryland College Charter granted it the right to award the bachelor’s degree. The founding School Sisters of Notre Dame were pioneers in the movement of 19th century women for equal educational opportunities. In 1961, the hall was renamed for Cardinal James Gibbons, the Archbishop of Baltimore who presided over the first commencement in 1899.

Today, Gibbons Hall is the historic hub on the campus of the only women’s college in the state. Gibbons’ Merrick Tower is a local landmark symbolizing the educational vision of the School Sisters of Notre Dame, a global congregation of religious women who came from Munich, Germany, to Baltimore in the late 1840s. The German Renaissance styled building was designed by Baltimore architect J. Crawford Neilson and reflects their Bavarian origins, with a bell tower, mansard roof, 278 windows, circular dormers and decorative frieze roof trim. The National Trust for Historic Preservation is a privately-funded nonprofit organization that works to save America’s historic places to enrich our future.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation is committed to protecting America’s rich cultural legacy and helping build vibrant, sustainable communities that reflect our nation’s diversity.

Grants from the National Trust Preservation Funds range from $2,500 to $5,000 and have provided over $15 million since 2003. These matching grants are awarded to nonprofit organizations and public agencies across the country to support wide-ranging activities including consultant services for rehabilitating buildings, technical assistance for tourism that promotes historic resources, and the development of materials for education and outreach campaigns.

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Faculty Reserves

It is time to submit reserves—both print and media—for your fall classes. The beginning of the semester is busy, and reserves are handled on a first come, first served basis. Reserves submitted by August 15 will be ready the first day of classes.

Reserve requests can be submitted through campus mail or via the Library homepage. For detailed information about submitting requests for media items, books, electronic reserves, and reserve items delivered through Joule, please visit the Library homepage and click on "Services" and then "Faculty Information." If you have questions or concerns, contact Christy Dentler for print reserves at ext. 6823 or cldentler1@loyola.edu, or Pat Turkos concerning media reserves at ext. 6822 or ppturkos@loyola.edu.

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Film Series at NDMU

The Art Seminar Group presents its final screening of the Summer Film Series 2014, “Tricolore: Italia, Cinema, Disegno,” on Tuesday, August 5, from 1:30 to 4 pm at the Knott Science Center Auditorium. Admission is $10 at the door. The film will be The Great Beauty (Paolo Sorrentino, 2013, 142 min) with Linda DeLibero.

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Notre Dame in the News

City Paper on Dr. Gene Farrington's Blue Heron

The City Paper interviewed Gene Farrington, Ph.D. of Notre Dame's English department on his latest novel, The Blue Heron. Here's an excerpt:

"Veteran professor of English and drama at the Notre Dame of Maryland University, he boasts an impressive familiarity with all things lit that not only bleeds through the pages of his new novel, The Blue Heron, but inevitably pokes in and out of his everyday vernacular...It is this linguistic tension between the archaic and the vulgar that opens The Blue Heron, the local author’s just-released, epic 585-pager that explores the fictional parallels between a pair of 20-something online chatters, David and Molly, and their ostensible historical predecessors. David and Molly are hotly contesting the many uses of Farrington’s favorite curse word when their chat room is intruded on by an unlikely guest: 16th century Native American Opechancanough."

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NDMU Students in the Huffington Post

Over the past several weeks, Huffington Post blogger Diane Prosper has written a series of features on the summer experiences of students at women's colleges. Two of our Notre Dame students have been profiled:

Brittany Dunkerly '15 is a biology major at Notre Dame of Maryland University, Baltimore, MD. As a participant in Notre Dame's Sr. Alma Science Year program, Brittany Dunkerly is spending her summer (and the rest of the academic year) at the world-renowned Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. Through the program, Brittany will continue in the cardiac pathology lab of Dr. Charles Steenbergen, where she has conducted research for two years. Her work contributed to the article "miR-181c Regulates the Mitochondrial Genome, Bioenergetics, and Propensity for Heart Failure In Vivo," published in the May 2014 issue of the scientific journal PLOS One. After graduation, Brittany plans to pursue a Ph.D. in pathobiology or cellular and molecular medicine.

Ashleigh Hughes '15 is a political science major with an international relations minor at Notre Dame of Maryland University, Baltimore, MD. For her summer internship in the Consumer Protection Division of the Office of the Maryland Attorney General, Ashleigh Hughes is mediating disputes between consumers and businesses. She helps clients navigate landlord/tenant issues and other conflicts by providing them with information needed to resolve their complaints. Ashleigh, who plans to practice law, has a passion for advocacy and conflict resolution. In her off-hours, she serves as director of community outreach for Parts of Peace, a student-run charity that connects needy families in Maryland with supplies, training, and resources.

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Professional Activities

School of Education: Sister Mary Fitzgerald SSND

Mary Fitzgerald, SSND, associate professor of education at Notre Dame of Maryland University, and Anthony Sabatino, Ed.D., clinical associate professor at Loyola Marymount University, have co-authored a book on leadership for the National Catholic Educational Association. The book, titled Leadership Succession Planning in Catholic Education: An Ongoing Plan for Leadership Development, Identification and Selection, was released in June by NCEA and is available on the NCEA website. Sr. Mary and her co-author made a presentation based on their research at the NCEA convention in Pittsburgh last month. Their presentation, Are You Prepared to Find Your Next Leader? was an interactive discussion with the audience based on data collected from across the United States. The presenters provided a rationale and planning guidelines for board chairs, superintendents and superiors of religious communities to use when the need arises to hire a new leader for a Catholic school.